Watching for prostate cancer is as effective as surgery or radiation therapy

The research is the first to evaluate the effectiveness of the three major procedures used in prostate cancer, as well as their effects and cost.

Monitoring prostate cancer offers the same chances of survival in the first ten years after the disease is detected than surgery or radiotherapy, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The survey, the largest ever done in the UK, which tracked more than 1,500 prostate cancer patients, showed that all three procedures have similar results and very low death rates.

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But the treatment reduces the risk of disease progression compared to mere surveillance, although it is also accompanied by more troublesome side effects, the study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), added.

COST X BENEFIT BETWEEN TREATMENTS

The research is the first to evaluate the effectiveness of the three major procedures used in prostate cancer, as well as their effects and cost.

“With this study, we have learned so far that prostate cancer detected in blood tests grows very slowly and that few men (about 1%) die from it when they are followed up over a period of ten years, regardless of treatment attributed, “said lead researcher Freddie Hamdy.

“That number is considerably lower than what we had anticipated before starting the study,” he added.

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However, surgical treatment (radical prostatectomy, total prostatectomy) and radiation therapy reduce the number of cases in which prostate cancer progresses and develops, although it has not yet been determined whether this means living longer or better, he added. the researcher at the University of Oxford.

The survey was based on data collected between 1999 and 2009 of more than 82,000 men aged 50-69 throughout the UK. 1,643 of them were diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Of the patients, 545 monitored the disease, 553 underwent radical prostatectomy, and 545 underwent radiotherapy.

In the surgery and radiotherapy groups, cancer progression fell by more than half compared to those who underwent active monitoring alone, but patients also experienced unpleasant side effects, especially in the first year of treatment.

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