Airline punished for asking for pregnancy test at job interview

Spanish government bodies consider this practice of the company that has 46% of its jobs occupied by women to be “discriminatory”, which in the case of flight attendants this number shoots to 71% of the hiring.

The Spanish airline Iberia received an administrative penalty of 25,000 euros (about 90,000 reais) from the Government of the Balearic Islands (in the Mediterranean) for submitting its candidates to urine tests to see if they were pregnant before contracting them.

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Spanish government bodies consider this practice of the company that has 46% of its jobs occupied by women to be “discriminatory”, which in the case of flight attendants this number shoots to 71% of the hiring.

Asked, the company assured that “it has never stopped hiring a woman because of being pregnant” and that it has “very strict” protocols to protect pregnant women in their team and candidates so that their tasks do not jeopardize “their health and that of the fetus. ”

The proposal for a sanction came from the Labor Inspectorate of the region after supervising a year ago a selection process, where there was a complaint that in refusing to contribute to the examination, the candidate was expelled from the process, according to sources from the Secretariat of Labor.

The airline claimed that the test was carried out for safety reasons, with the aim of protecting workers who were pregnant and applying the protocol of prevention of labor risks appropriate to these cases.

Despite this, Iberia has rectified and, from now on, will not ask women to undergo a pregnancy test, but rather trusts that they will “communicate their condition in advance” and thus be able to adjust their temporary functions.

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However, the unions today demanded that the company modify its personnel selection process so that information about a possible pregnancy occurs after hiring and never before.

UGT, one of the main Spanish unions, recalled that the evidence may be required of female workers in order to prevent risks, but not during the selection process.

For her part, the Spanish Minister of Health, Social Services and Equality, Dolors Montserrat, today showed her “absolute disapproval” of Iberia’s attitude towards women and advocated the implementation of a “blind curriculum” in order to avoid any type of discrimination.